writing resources

Photo Writing Prompt: Land & Sea

Try your hand at writing a 1000 word or less story based on one of these prompts.

writing-prompts

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Book Review of Prompt Me

I received my first blog review of Prompt Me: Creative Writing Workbook & Journal by romance writer and teacher, Brooke E. Wayne. Read the review here. So exciting!

 

Prompt Me by Robin Woods Front Cover

Or view it on Amazon here. Blessings!

Writing Resource: Where Do We FEEL Emotion?

When a character has an emotional reaction to something, it is good for he or she to have a realistic physical response to match. This is a quick graphic based on medical research as to where we actually feel the emotions in our bodies. Whether you agree or not, I hope this helps you think through your responses.

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Resource: 2 Photo Writing Prompts

A little writing inspiration for you:
1

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New Release! Writing Workbook & Journal

I’m so pleased to announce the release of my seventh book! I’ve been teaching English for over two decades, so putting together a writing book seemed a natural progression. Many of the charts and reference materials were items I created for my own writing, and have been sharing them with my writer friends for years. They encouraged me to add to what I had, and get it out to the general public. I hope you find it as useful as I have.

Prompt Me Novel Front Cover

Fiction Writing Journal & Workbook

“This workbook provides a space for you to journal ideas and thoughts for your next–or first–best seller. Robin not only shares her knowledge gained by years of experience, but thoughtfully gives space for writers to reflect and hand-write their ideas and moments of inspiration.” –author and editor Tamar Hela

Writing a first draft can be daunting. This workbook provides guidance for key elements of fiction writing that help create a cohesive novel. Additionally, it gives writers powerful reference resources to create an emotionally authentic work and the space to hash it all out in one, easy-to-carry book.

Workbook sections include:

Fiction Writing Cover 8.25 x 10.5 (2 sharp)

OLD COVER

 

  • Brainstorm and outlining
  • Plotting and the “Tent Pole” Method
  • Character Worksheets
  • Conflict
  • Setting
  • Lined pages for easy journaling
  • And more!

 

Plot Diagram WS thumb

 

Reference sections include:

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Resource: Realistic Travel Times

Writing Resource | Realistic Travel Times | Robin Woods | #amwriting #writingtips #writing #writingcommunity

People who don’t live in California seem to think that everyone is within an hour from Disneyland. More than once I’ve had people contact me, telling me that they were going to be in LA, so maybe we can meet up for dinner. Now, depending on where this person is in the LA Basin, drive times from San Jose (40 minutes south of San Francisco) can range from 5 1/2 hours to 6 1/2 hours.  People always seem to be shocked to learn how large California actually is.  In fact, if you were to drive from the most southern large city, San Diego, north to the Oregon border, it would take you over 11 hours on a good day with no stops.

Google Can Be Your Friend

The point I am making, is that you need to research your travel times.  It is so easy to simply Google the directions from place to place. Google will even given you travel times for car, bus, bicycle, and walking.

Google Maps

But Google Won’t Tell Me

But sometimes Google won’t work. Maybe your characters are traveling on a private jet, or maybe your novel takes place in 1850.  Here are some fantastic resources to help you:

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Author Lauren Lynne’s Interview with Robin Woods

RobinWoods2014I had the honor of being interviewed by young adult writer, Lauren Lynne.

Welcome to my interview with novelist, Robin Woods, author of The Watcher Series.

Hello, Robin,

I’m glad you’re here! First some fun trivia – give me some juicy details…!

[Click here to read the full interview on Lauren’s site]

Resource: Free Backgrounds & Textures

Resource Textures and Backgrounds

Pictures of Nothing?

When I travel, I am often seen taking pictures of what must seem like random things to other people. I stand six inches from wallpaper or get down on my knees to catch the perfect angle of a fallen leaf. This summer, I visited Nevada a couple of times.  These pictures were taken in The Silver Legacy Hotel & Casino. The Starbucks barista did look at me a little funny when I took a picture of the cup sleeves, but I’m glad I did.

Here  is a sample of what you can do with these photos:

Gandhi Quote

I used a fabulous website called Canva to add the text.

Photos are free for use with credit

These pictures are free to use as long as you credit me and link to my site:
Photo by Robin Woods www.RobinWoodsFiction.com

Metal Petina 1

Metal Patina 3

Wallpaper 1 (more…)

Writing Resource: 8 Tips on Dialogue

Dialogue is an integral part of any novel. Here are eight ways to upgrade your dialogue and avoid some newbie pitfalls.

Improving Dialogue

  1. Every conversation should move the plot forward. No empty fillers, please.
  2. Pick a punctuation style and stick to it. If you are going to query a major publisher, you may want to use Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS). Regardless of what you choose to use, consistency is key. For example: if you use an en-dash when a character is cut off in a conversation, do it every time. 
  3. People rarely use each others’ names in conversation after an initial greeting.

    Here is an example of overuse:
    “Heya, Eric.”
    “Hello, Nora.”

    “Eric, how has your summer been so far?”
    “Well, Nora, it has been rather busy. I’m ready to slow down for a bit.”
    “I totally understand, Eric. I have been busy too.”

    Besides the fact that the dialogue is a yawn fest, people don’t naturally use one another’s names that much when talking. I makes your characters sound like game show hosts. “Yes, Vanna.” (more…)

Writing Resource: Words for Tastes & Aromas

I haven’t offered a free resource in a little while. so here is my latest offering.  Often writers forget to incorporate all five senses, make sure you include taste and smell, in addition to what your characters touch and see. Here is a cheat sheet to help you add sensory details involving the most overlooked senses.

Tastes & Aromas

Here is a downloadable PDF for personal use: Tastes & Aromas

Do you have any sensory words that you love to use?

Related Posts:

 

Check out the resources and master lists in the Prompt Me Series here on Amazon.

prompt me series by robin woods 2019

 

Empower your creativity.