#amediting

New Author Checklist: 10 Things to Do

So, you published your book? That is amazing! You should take a minute to revel in the accomplishment. Really. You did something a lot of people dream of doing but never do.

Now, I would take a second to bookmark this page. I’ll wait. Done? Great.

First of all, you don’t need to do everything on this checklist today. I would advise doing one item a day for the next several days.

This is pretty much the list of what I wish I’d known when I started back in 2010. I had to “just figure it out.” There are so many more resources out there now–and so many more doors are open to indie and small pub writers.

So, here we go!

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Writing Resource: Words for Light & Dark

I can almost taste summer. Can’t you? It has been such a fabulously stormy winter that I’m looking forward to some sunny days and a writing getaway.

As I sat trying to rest up for teaching tomorrow, I was thinking about light and dark. It inspired me to put a list together and dabble with a little graphic design. Anyway, here are the fruits of my labor. I hope it helps inspire you to write this week.

Here is a PDF for easier printing with both versions: Words to DescribeLight & Dark (1) (more…)

New Release! Prompt Me More

I am thrilled to announce the release of my ninth title, Prompt Me More, the second Prompt Me Workbook and Journal. My life has been a whir of activity and this has been the perfect creative outlet. I hope you enjoy the prompts–I have a special affection for the photo and dialogue prompts in this book.

Well, there is no more need for preamble. Here’s the info you have been waiting for:

 

This workbook is sophisticated enough for adults and clean enough for teens.

If you want a little sneak peek at what’s inside. Here’s a graphic. Your favorites have returned, along with some new sections.  (more…)

Writing Resource: 188 Words for Sounds

When writing or editing, sometimes it’s nice to have a cheat sheet next to you to save time. As William Cowper once said:

“Variety’s the very spice of life, that gives it all it’s flavour.”

Mix it up and have fun. As usual, a printer-friendly PDF is at the bottom. Do you have any sound words you love to use?

words-for-sounds

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Writing Resource: Words to Describe Voice Infographic

As I have been pecking away at the keys working on my new projects, I’ve been compiling a little list for myself. I thought I would make it pretty and share it with all of you. I do like to share. Is that weird? Well, not everything—my toothbrush is off limits. Now that I have made that clear, here is my latest infographic.

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Book Review of Prompt Me

I received my first blog review of Prompt Me: Creative Writing Workbook & Journal by romance writer and teacher, Brooke E. Wayne. Read the review here. So exciting!

 

Prompt Me by Robin Woods Front Cover

Or view it on Amazon here. Blessings!

Writing Resource: Where Do We FEEL Emotion?

When a character has an emotional reaction to something, it is good for he or she to have a realistic physical response to match. This is a quick graphic based on medical research as to where we actually feel the emotions in our bodies. Whether you agree or not, I hope this helps you think through your responses.

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New Release! Writing Workbook & Journal

I’m so pleased to announce the release of my seventh book! I’ve been teaching English for over two decades, so putting together a writing book seemed a natural progression. Many of the charts and reference materials were items I created for my own writing, and have been sharing them with my writer friends for years. They encouraged me to add to what I had, and get it out to the general public. I hope you find it as useful as I have.

Prompt Me Novel Front Cover

Fiction Writing Journal & Workbook

“This workbook provides a space for you to journal ideas and thoughts for your next–or first–best seller. Robin not only shares her knowledge gained by years of experience, but thoughtfully gives space for writers to reflect and hand-write their ideas and moments of inspiration.” –author and editor Tamar Hela

Writing a first draft can be daunting. This workbook provides guidance for key elements of fiction writing that help create a cohesive novel. Additionally, it gives writers powerful reference resources to create an emotionally authentic work and the space to hash it all out in one, easy-to-carry book.

Workbook sections include:

Fiction Writing Cover 8.25 x 10.5 (2 sharp)

OLD COVER

 

  • Brainstorm and outlining
  • Plotting and the “Tent Pole” Method
  • Character Worksheets
  • Conflict
  • Setting
  • Lined pages for easy journaling
  • And more!

 

Plot Diagram WS thumb

 

Reference sections include:

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Resource: Realistic Travel Times

Realistic Travel

 

People who don’t live in California seem to think that everyone is within an hour from Disneyland. More than once I’ve had people contact me, telling me that they were going to be in LA, so maybe we can meet up for dinner. Now, depending on where this person is in the LA Basin, drive times from San Jose (40 minutes south of San Francisco) can range from 5 1/2 hours to 6 1/2 hours.  People always seem to be shocked to learn how large California actually is.  In fact, if you were to drive from the most southern large city, San Diego, north to the Oregon border, it would take you over 11 hours.

Google Can Be Your Friend

The point I am making, is that you need to research your travel times.  It is so easy to simply Google the directions from place to place. Google will even given you travel times for car, bus, bicycle, and walking.

Google Maps

But Google Won’t Tell Me

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Writing Resource: 8 Tips on Dialogue

Dialogue is an integral part of any novel. Here are eight ways to upgrade your dialogue and avoid some newbie pitfalls.

Improving Dialogue

  1. Every conversation should move the plot forward. No empty fillers, please.
  2. Pick a punctuation style and stick to it. If you are going to query a major publisher, you may want to use Chicago Manual of Style (CMOS). Regardless of what you choose to use, consistency is key. For example: if you use an en-dash when a character is cut off in a conversation, do it every time. 
  3. People rarely use each others’ names in conversation after an initial greeting.

    Here is an example of overuse:
    “Heya, Eric.”
    “Hello, Nora.”

    “Eric, how has your summer been so far?”
    “Well, Nora, it has been rather busy. I’m ready to slow down for a bit.”
    “I totally understand, Eric. I have been busy too.”

    Besides the fact that the dialogue is a yawn fest, people don’t naturally use one another’s names that much when talking. I makes your characters sound like game show hosts. “Yes, Vanna.” (more…)